Acknowledgement of Territory and the Impact of White Privilege

We want to acknowledge that we live within the traditional territory of the Snoqualmie tribe. Tribal members have lived in the Puget Sound region since time immemorial. Long before explorers came to the Pacific Northwest, our people hunted deer and elk, fished for salmon, and gathered berries and wild plants for food and medicine. Today, many live in Snoqualmie, North Bend, Fall City, Carnation, Issaquah, Mercer Island, and Monroe.

Tribal members were signatories of the Treaty of Point Elliott of 1855, which reserved Native American Tribes in the Puget Sound area, including Snoqualmie, the right to hunt, fish, and live in the places they had done so for thousands of years. At the time, the Snoqualmie Indian Tribe was one of the largest in the Puget Sound region totaling around 4,000. The Tribe lost federal recognition in 1953 but regained Bureau of Indian Affairs recognition in 1999. This allowed the Tribe to develop the Snoqualmie Casino which financially supports services and resources for Tribe members and the local community.

The Snoqualmie Indian Tribe is a federally recognized tribe in the Puget Sound region of Washington State. Known as the People of the Moon, Snoqualmie were signatories to the Treaty of Point Elliott in 1855. For more information visit www.snoqualmietribe.us.

Favorite Native authors

 

Local native businesses to support:
Our Guide to Seattle's Native-Owned Establishments and Holiday Events! – Eighth Generation

Native Works (nativeworkscsc.org)

Intentionalist: Celebrate Pacific Islander-Owned Businesses | South Seattle Emerald

We also want to acknowledge the debt we owe to people of color. As we work toward building a more equitable society, we must consider our own past and acknowledge the role our heritage played since the arrival of Europeans to this land. Our ancestors perpetuated the atrocity of slavery and the repression of enslaved people, leading to systematic disadvantages that their descendants have endured for generations. We deeply regret and denounce these shameful aspects of our history, both known and unknown.

Interested in exploring more about racism in America? We recommend these books as starting points:

 

As acknowledgement of these debts, Arborea Falls is committed to providing reserved, free access to our grounds and forest to BIPOC individuals for communion with nature. To schedule a visit, contact us at owners(at)arboreafalls.com. We also offer discounts and priority for hosting public community events that support LGBTQIA+ and BIPOC communities.